Winter Meeting (1948)

The later films from Bette Davis’ studio years are always interesting, because her real life had intruded so heavily into her working life and Hollywood image that she was forced into a sort of typecasting, being suited — at least according to studios and audiences — only for characters with a hard edge to them,…

Elsewhere: The Adorable Dogs and Hollywood Butts Edition

Things I’ve written elsewhere, and other stuff around the interwebs lately: My piece on The Human Factor (1979) as an underrated gem is up at Spectrum Culture. This is now available on MOD DVD at Warner Archives, in a print that I absolutely adored, because the grain was kept — all that delicious, nutritious 1970s…

Friday, August 16: Watch Me Watch Star Wars (1977) for the First Time

A quick note for fans of all things Stacia: I’ll be watching Star Wars (1977) for the first time ever this Friday, August 16, at 8:00 PM Central. I’ll be tweeting along to it with the hashtag #starwars, and would be tickled if anyone wanted to join in, or just come by to point and…

The Curse of the Working Classes: Joe Don Baker is Mitchell! (1975)

The 1975 low-budget vigilante cop flick Mitchell concerns the titular police detective, played by Joe Don Baker, and his quest to prove that skeevy lawyer Walter Deaney (John Saxon) shot an unarmed robber and falsely claimed self defense. Mitchell’s superiors don’t want him to pursue the evidence, so they shuffle him off to another assignment…

William Castle Blogathon: Let’s Kill Uncle (1966)

This is the SBBN entry for the William Castle Blogathon, hosted by The Last Drive-In and Goregirl’s Dungeon. Check out Goregirl’s page here for a full list of all contributors! *** William Castle was a solid B-movie studio director in the 1940s, responsible for films like Undertow (1949), The Whistler (1944) and The Saracen Blade…