Warner Archive: Arrowsmith (1931)

In 1931, producer Samuel Goldwyn was in a real bind. His film The Unholy Garden had been a complete disaster from start to finish, enraging Ronald Colman, Goldwyn Pictures’ star actor, who never quite got over having been contractually forced to appear in the film. A horrifying production, terrible reviews and even worse box office receipts plagued the film. As Goldwyn’s biographer A. Scott Berg put it, “The Unholy Garden would forever stand as the worst blot on the records of everyone involved with it.” It was that kind of bad movie. When Goldwyn chose Sinclair Lewis’ award-winning novel Arrowsmith for Colman’s next film, he did so with nothing but good intentions and hopes of repairing both his and Colman’s reputations. In choosing Arrowsmith, however, he immediately (and surely inadvertently) saddled the film with it’s own reputation of, as Self-Styled Siren put it, being “dull Oscar-bait.” Where there is an award, there will be award bait, and it’s true that Arrowsmith fits that bill to an extent. The biggest flaw of this cinematic adaptation — and perhaps the reason no studio producer was interested in the novel in the first place — is that paring the story down meant the little nuance Lewis’ novel possessed was lost in on-the-nose dialogue and visuals, with not a simile or metaphor to be found. As my beloved Mordaunt Hall said in the New York Times on Arrowsmith’s release: This highly praiseworthy translation of the career of Martin Arrowsmith, M. D., may seem a … Continue reading

Elsewhere: The Doomed to Repeat the Past Edition

Some sad and frustrating news: According to Michael Blake, Universal plans to tear down the historic Stage 28. Inside Universal has more about the closure, and the rumor that the demolition is to make way for more theme part attractions. There’s a petition to save the stage here, already at 1,400 signatures as of this posting. Those curious about the history of the stage might want to check out my article on Stage 28 for the Universal Backlot Blogathon in 2012. — After shamefully neglecting the blog for mumblemumble weeks, I have several scintillating updates coming in the next few days. First, the links; later, the rants. Maybe. I dunno, guys, it’s late in the summer and it’s too hot to have any emotions. Wait, is tickled an emotion? Because I’m absolutely tickled to announce that, as of this month, I’ve joined Next Projection as a writer/critic. Check out my first few articles here: * The Bride of Frankenstein (1935) review for Second Coming: Cinema’s Greatest Sequels * Dead Man (1995) review for Strange Paradise: The Cinema of Jim Jarmusch * Child of God (2013): Despite the middling to poor reviews this film got on the festival circuit, I had hopes that it would be worthwhile. Those hopes were misplaced. – While I no longer write columns for ClassicFlix, I still do monthly DVD reviews: * My August DVD review: The Big House (1930) – And finally, some interesting links to waste I mean spend your time on: * A … Continue reading

Are You Here (2013)

Zach Galifianakis in Are You Here

Are You Here ★★☆☆☆ Director: Matthew Weiner Millennium Entertainment 113 Minutes In Theaters August 22, 2014 (Limited) and on DVD September 30, 2014 – Quirky comedy Are You Here (2013) is a tale of the most bourgeois of bromances, two pals in a bizarre, yet strangely dull, codependent relationship. This is the first feature-length outing from Matthew Weiner, a writer-director with one hell of a pedigree. Despite his stellar writing on the iconic “Mad Men,” Are You Here reflects none of the nuance or introspection audiences have come to expect from his work. Owen Wilson plays the inexplicably named Steve Dallas, an Annapolis weatherman and womanizer whose loyalty to buddy Ben (Zach Galifianakis) is based not just on a lifetime of friendship, but copious weed and the fact that only an emotionally askew person like Ben would put up with Dallas in the first place. Ben is not an easy person to love, either; his passions, while noble, turn hostile at whim. When Ben’s estranged father dies, he returns to his hometown with Steve in tow. The situation is as uncomfortable as expected: his sister Terri (Amy Poehler) is perpetually angry, especially at their dad’s young widow (Laura Ramsey), and when Ben is left the bulk of the large estate, the situation becomes critical. Though ostensibly about Ben’s family, the film’s real focus is on Steve, whom a rakish Wilson portrays as the exact kind of rakish character he’s played for well over a decade. Steve spends his days trolling … Continue reading

Earth Girls Are Easy (1988)

Valerie (Geena Davis) is a gorgeous beautician living in the San Fernando Valley with her doctor fiance Ted (Charles Rocket). For reasons never explained — his girlfriend is Geena Davis, for cryin’ out loud — Ted likes to boff other women, thus neglects Valerie in the bedroom and can’t get too worked up for their impending nuptials. The day after he gets his cheatin’ ass kicked out of their gorgeous Valley home, an adorable spaceship holding three very fuzzy aliens crashes in the pool. They can’t speak English and think Lava Lamps are refreshing beverages, but otherwise are mostly harmless. Quick-thinking Valerie gets her stoner friend Woody (Michael McKean) to drain the pool so the ship can be repaired, but it will take a day for the water to drain. In an attempt to keep the aliens from being discovered as, well, aliens, she brings them to the beauty shop she works at, where master beautician Candy (Julie Brown) shaves them all down and turns them into hunks, as one does: Shenanigans ensue as they go out and party the night away. Meanwhile, jerkface Ted starts to suspect something is up, while Valerie and the captain of the alien ship, Mac (Jeff Goldblum) fall in love. A see-through hot pink swimsuit, just like grandma used to wear.   Earth Girls Are Easy (1988) exists solely as a vehicle for beefcake and cheesecake. Okay, sure, there are some musical numbers, and Julie Brown’s script and pop songs are a hoot — … Continue reading