Hell on Wheels: Roller Boogie (1979) and the Slow Death of Disco

In a world where parks are full of small, evenly spaced groups of people all wearing skin-tight clothing in bright primary colors, where everyone is required by law to blow dry their hair and wear lip gloss, one recreational sport reigns supreme: roller disco. Voluptuous young Terry Barkley (Linda Blair) is a musical genius —…

Clifford (1994)

It’s 2050, and creepy priest Father Clifford (Martin Short), at a location meant to look like a Christian orphanage, is talking young Roger (Ben Savage) out of running away. He understands that Roger is running away because something-something-intelligence-boredom, thus begins a heartfelt tale of his own struggles to deal with an overactive imagination when he…

The Spiderpool

The history of the Spiderpool is the quintessential Hollywood story, a particularly American brand of fairy tale that begins with excess and eccentricity, wild parties and beautiful women. Like so many American dreams, it was over almost as soon as it began, and what was once celebrated became nothing more than crumbling remnants of exploitation, disappointment and lost dreams.

A Very Brief History of a Very Famous Mask

William Shatner as Captain Kirk as Michael Myers in Halloween (1978).   It’s one of the most iconic props in modern horror movie history, but what was it, anyway, and where is it now? The first mask used for the character of Michael Myers in the now-classic John Carpenter flick Halloween (1978) was a store-bought…

The Law and Jake Wade (1958)

The Law and Jake Wade is not just a gorgeous film to look at but an exciting tale, and a solid entry in the American Western genre.

Horror Hosts #2

A gallery of horror movie hosts from the golden age of television, including Vampira, Ghoulardi, Count Shockula, Bob Wilkins and more.

Hollywood in Costume

Clifton Webb, Marlene Dietrich, and Elizabeth Allan at a Hollywood theme party held by Basil Rathbone and wife Ouida Bergere in 1935. The theme was “The Person You Most Admire.” Dietrich chose Leda of the famous fable, while her escort for the night, Elizabeth Allen, went as Dietrich.

Dunsmuir House (Burnt Offerings, 1976)

Dunsmuir House, Built 1899 2960 Peralta Oaks Court, Oakland, California Seen in: Burnt Offerings (1976), Phantasm (1979), A View to a Kill (1985), So I Married an Axe Murderer (1993), & More     “A COAL KING GONE” announced the Los Angeles Herald on the morning of February 1, 1900. Alexander Dunsmuir, the 47-year-old multimillionaire,…

It’s Halloween on SBBN!

Hello everyone, and welcome to another exciting October here at SBBN. Most years we try to do a little something fun for Halloween month, and this year is no exception, but before we get too carried away, let’s give a little love to past Halloween hootenannies: A Very Brief History of a Very Famous Mask:…

S.O.B. (1981)

Blake Edwards was mad at Hollywood. He’d gone through some things, man, and now he had a whole lot of beef with the entire cynical, money-grubbing, back-stabbing lot. In 1981, after making a comeback with mega-hits The Pink Panther and 10, he started on a nasty little poison pen letter to Tinseltown called S.O.B., short for “standard operational bullshit,” otherwise known as the way Hollywood always works.

The Delinquents (1957)

What sets The Delinquents apart from other low-budget teen flicks of the time is its professional look. It’s clean, even sleek, and without the (usually hilarious) errors one would find in something meant to basically be background noise while teenagers necked in the back seat.

Flamingo Road (1949)

Joan Crawford is Lane Bellamy, a hoochie dancer with a heart of gold, who runs the gamut from fallen woman to girl trying to make good to rich society dame, with all the requisite melodrama that entails.

Torch Song (1953)

If you had to pick one best thing about the camp classic Torch Song (1953) — as if it’s even possible to do so, but let’s pretend — it’s that Joan Crawford’s Broadway diva Jenny Stewart is a stone cold monster.

Demon Seed (1977)

Demon Seed, previously available only on DVD, is now also available in Blu-ray from Warner Archive. It’s a heady mix of frightening and campy, the kind of film that would do equally well in a double feature with Alien or with Terrorvision (go go Gerrit Graham film marathon!)