January Movies to Watch For

Are we dead? Did the Mayan spaceship blow us up on the winter solstice? No? Then sit your big butts back down on those couches and start watching movies like God and Greyhound intended! Here are some films on Fox Movie Channel, Sundance and TCM for the month of January that you might be interested in. Remember, these movies may be edited, time compressed, in the wrong aspect ratio, have commercial interruptions, or contain subliminal messages compelling you to toss articulated bodies off cliffs as part of a series of elaborate insurance scams. You know how it goes. All times Eastern.   FOX MOVIE CHANNEL Night Train to Paris (1964) January 1, 4:50 AM (early morning) Leslie Nielsen as a retired secret agent on one last mission in Paris. This gets horrible reviews, so beware!   TRIPLE FEATURE ON JANUARY 2ND: Leave Her to Heaven (1945) at 6:00 AM Daisy Kenyon (1947) at 8:00 AM Laura (1947) at 10:00 AM Fox Movie Channel rarely has more than two films in a row worth watching, but this is a terrific line up that you might want to marathon on the 2nd. If you’re not still hung over from the 31st, that is.   The Driver (1978) January 10, 1:15 PM Director Walter Hill’s cult fave about an obsessed cop (Bruce Dern) after a getaway driver (Ryan O’Neal).   Heaven With a Barbed Wire Fence (1939) January 10, 4:50 AM (early morning the 11th) A New Yorker’s adventure on the way to … Continue reading

The White Shadow (1924)

Watch the surviving reels of Alfred Hitchcock’s earliest feature film The White Shadow (1924) online for free at The National Film Preservation Foundation. It’s only up until January 15, so watch it soon! Alfred Hitchcock and Alma Reville at their wedding in December, 1926.   Three reels of The White Shadow, about half the film, were recently discovered in New Zealand. In May of this year, Self-Styled Siren, Ferdy on Film and This Island Rod hosted the annual For the Love of Film Blogathon, proceeds of which went to allowing the restored White Shadow to be streamed online. Known as White Shadows in the U.S. and The White Shadow in the U.K., apparently not much is known about the film. Hitch, just 24 years old at the time, adapted the screenplay from Michael Morton’s unpublished novel Children of Chance. Morton was a well known dramatist whose biggest success was to come a few years after Shadow, when he adapted Agatha Christie’s The Murder of Roger Ackroyd into the play Alibi. Hitch worked many jobs on Shadow; he was not only writer but assistant director, editor and production designer of the film. David Sterrit considers The White Shadow to be a “missing link” in Hitch’s career, an example of work from the bridge of his career between neophyte title designer to director. Shadow is alternately listed as released in 1923 or 1924, with a February, 1924 review from a U.K. publication and Silent Era pinpointing the U.S. release date to October … Continue reading

TCM Remembers 2012

This year’s TCM Remembers, thankfully posted by TCM this year (which means you don’t have to rely on my iffy video editing skills to watch it on YouTube, and that benefits us all). Thanks to eagle eyed SBBN man about town Kingo Gondo for letting me know the video was up! It is a lovely tribute, but I am going to be honest: It’s unfortunate that they had so many people shown for a single brief second while indulging in lengthy gaps for all the filler and atmosphere. But hey, go check it out yourself and see what you think. Update 1/14/2013: It appears TCM has made the video private on YouTube. It can still be found here on Vimeo.

The Late Movies Blogathon: 10 Laps to Go (1936)

Edit 07/06/2013: For anyone interested in doing their own project on Marie Prevost, due to problems over the years, you need to know a few things: 1) You can use my blog posts for sources, but they must be credited in footnotes or bibliography (as should any book, blog, magazine, or other source). You cannot just cut and paste sections of my blog into your own work. Please know that I will not just ignore copyright infringement, should it occur. 2) There may be errors in my blog posts. You’re responsible for doing your own research and verifying anything you read. 3) I will not help you with your Marie Prevost research. Please don’t ask. 4) I own some memorabilia, photos, archival docs, etc., but I do not lend them out for any reason. Please don’t ask. 5) Despite any claim you may have heard to the contrary, I have not assisted nor collaborated with anyone in their book or article on Marie Prevost. For more details, read here. *** This post is for shadowplay’s The Late Show: The Late Movies Blogathon. Please visit shadowplay to see more entries in this exceptional series! *** Hot shot speed demon Larry Evans (Rex Lease) has teamed up with the aging engineer Corbett (Tom Moore) for a super fast, super hot new car design he plans to drive in the big race. His rival Eddie DeSilva (Duncan Reynaldo) is an evil, evil man, as you can tell because of an accent that places … Continue reading

Elsewhere Today: Writin’ For Spectrum Culture

I have three reviews up on Spectrum Culture today, which should explain why things have been a little quiet around here: Revisit: Death To Smoochy (2002): “…Underneath the obvious joke, Death to Smoochy is practically Shakespearean in its tragedy. Children’s entertainment is used as an analogue for the entire entertainment biz, not merely the crooked world of kid’s shows. The focus is less on the business itself than on its effect on individuals, like former child star Buggy Ding Dong (Vincent Schiavelli), now a drug-addled, urine-covered hit man. Spinner Dunn (Michael Rispoli) had been a boxer, a man once well paid to punch another man for the entertainment of others, now a goofball left with the mind of a young child. Everyone in the biz has been broken by it in some essential way, their dreams discarded as a world of fame, money and groupies overwhelmed them, then discarded them.” *** Addicted To Fame (2012): “Director David Giancola warned Anna Nicole Smith and her partner Howard K. Stern that if she did not complete Illegal Aliens, he would replace her by having her alien character morph into a banana, then he would release the behind-the-scenes footage of her antics and she would be put on, as Giancola said, “the acting blacklist.” The acting blacklist, mind you, as though there is a large leather-bound tome kept hidden in a dungeon somewhere just south of Burbank, guarded by wizened old character actors in retirement, names of misbehaving personalities carefully recorded in the … Continue reading

The Late Show: The Late Movies Blogathon going on now at Shadowplay!

The sublime dcairns of shadowplay is hosting his annual blogathon The Late Show: The Late Films Blogathon. The theme is the last film of… well, of something, or someone. The ‘thon is running from the 1st through the 7th, and you can find all of dcairns’ entries as well as the rest of the submitters here. Yours truly will have at least one post up by Friday, hopefully two, it depends on how a few deadlines work out. Don’t forget to visit shadowplay, and even though it’s late notice, if you have something to contribute, please do!

2013 Silent Film Benefit Calendars are now!

Rodney Sauer of the Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra is once again producing the terrific Silent Film Calendars, with proceeds this year going to benefit George Eastman House. This year’s theme is Flying Machines, and as you can see from the cover, Wings (1927) features prominently. Look closely: The official SBBN patron saint El Brendel is on the left. That’s why you should buy two calendars, or maybe three. Please check out the official page at the Mont Alto site here. Calendars are $14.72 for U.S. shipping, with modest discounts for buying more than one, and the profits go to a good cause! I’ve bought a calendar for the past several years, and they have been both fun and useful. The birthdays of silent film stars listed on the calendar has saved my bacon more than once. Plus, this year promises to have at least one photo of a dirigible, and you can’t pass that up. Nobody can.