Phase IV (1974)

Phase IV is a slow, moody kind of film, with a decidedly trippy early 70s aesthetic and a synth music score that anticipates the indie horror trend just around the corner.

Murder, My Sweet (1944)

Murder, My Sweet is frequently considered to be second-tier film noir (when it’s not being forgotten entirely), and that’s a shame, as it’s a fine example of the film noir cycle. Influential and entertaining, this psychological thriller is a must-see for classic film fans.

Prick Up Your Ears (1987)

Prick Up Your Ears does well in the details, especially when it comes to the collage that Halliwell covers their tiny apartment walls with, but the film also tends to skim the surface of lives that were fascinating and complicated…

The SBBN Blogiversary and Begging Post

She Blogged By Night celebrates its 8th anniversary today, something that is alternately awesome and horrifying. Thank you to those who have stuck around this long!

The Hunger (1983)

Despite being a mainstream, upscale version of the European erotic horror flicks of the 1970s, Tony Scott’s The Hunger goes to unnecessary lengths to distance its vampires from the creatures already well-established in the public’s consciousness.

The Last American Virgin (1982)

Dismissed by many as just another crass teenage sex romp not-so-secretly marketed to pervs a generation older than the stars on the screen, The Last American Virgin (1982), in truth, doesn’t disabuse anyone of that notion during its first half.

West of Zanzibar (1928)

This is the SBBN entry for The Barrymore Trilogy Blogathon, hosted by In the Good Old Days of Classic Hollywood. Make sure to click here and enjoy all the fantastic entries! Poster art courtesy Jorday Jaquay on Pinterest. *** Lon Chaney was one of the biggest movie stars of the silent era, a master of…

Criminal Court (1946)

Criminal Court is a tight little noir directed by Robert Wise, starring Tom Conway as a hot-shot attorney who accidentally frames his girlfriend for murder.

King of the Gypsies (1978)

The scene is set at a gypsy camp in the 1940s, as Zharko Stepanowicz (Sterling Hayden in one of his late-career mandatory beard roles), self-proclaimed King of the Gypsies, demands to be given young Rose (Tiffany Bogart), as he’s already paid $4,000 for her so she can marry his son Groffo (Mark Vahanian). Rose’s parents…